Tuesday, November 8, 2016

2016 Election Night

11/14/16 5:30pm:
The Trump camp failed to request a recount in New Hampshire before the 5pm deadline. Clinton takes the Granite state's four electoral votes.



11/10/16 7:45pm:
Arizona added to Trump's column.



11/9/16 11:30am:
The AP calls Minnesota for Clinton. That is a narrow hold for Democrats.



11/9/16 2:40am:
Wisconsin puts Trump over the top; another flip for the Republican.



11/9/16 2:15am:
Alaska stays in the Republican column.




11/9/16 2:10am:
And the second congressional district in Nebraska is called for Trump.



11/9/16 2am:
The Maine call is in and we have the second electoral vote split in the Maine/Nebraska era. Maine's second congressional district follows Nebraska's second district in 2008 in going against the statewide result. Clinton wins the state and CD1 while Trump takes CD2.



11/9/16 1:40pm:
Pennsylvania flips to Trump. That 20 electoral votes puts Trump within range of 270 (and with some networks having called Wisconsin for him).




11/9/16 12:25am:
Clinton holds Nevada.



11:35pm:
Trump flips Iowa; something that has been in the cards since at least the conventions. Trump also holds Georgia after a lengthy wait.




11:25pm:
Utah goes for Trump. He will lag behind Romney there, but still take the Beehive state with relative ease.




11:15pm:
North Carolina is a Republican hold for Trump. Oregon is another non-Rust Belt leaner to stay with the Democrats.




11pm:
The next round of closings out west put California, Hawaii and Washington into the Clinton category. Trump takes Idaho. The close night in the Rust Belt extends to the electoral vote count for the time being.




10:55pm:
Florida follows Ohio as a Trump flip. Understatement alert: That is a big one.




10:40pm:
Colorado stays in the blue column. The outside the Rust Belt/midwest leaners are falling into place for Clinton. Those in that region are tighter.




10:25pm:
Ohio goes to Trump and Virginia to Clinton. One of those is bigger symbolically than the other.




10:10pm:
Missouri to Trump and New Mexico to Clinton.



10pm:
Closings in Arizona, Iowa, Nevada, and Utah. No calls. Montana to Trump.



9:30pm:
Arkansas and Louisiana turn red and Connecticut falls into Clinton's column.



9:00pm:
An extended radio hit pulled FHQ away. We will feel in the gaps in time. As for now a big jump for both candidates.




7:30pm:
West Virginia to Trump. North Carolina and Ohio are too close to call as of now.




7:00pm:
Wasting no time, Indiana and Kentucky go Trump and Vermont is added to Clinton's column.



6:00pm:
Let's color this thing in. FHQ will have maps and comments both here and on twitter (@FHQ) all evening.


--
Recent Posts:
The Electoral College Map (11/8/16) -- Election Day

The Electoral College Map (11/7/16)

The Electoral College Map (11/6/16)

Follow FHQ on TwitterGoogle+ and Facebook or subscribe by Email.

The Electoral College Map (11/8/16) -- Election Day



Changes (11/8/16):
Election Day.

As there were only a few more polls added to the mix on the final day of the 2016 campaign -- or in just under the wire yesterday -- there were only a few subtle changes to the figures here at FHQ. 
  • South Carolina pushed past Texas toward the partisan line on the Electoral College Spectrum below, but neither will budge from the Trump column. Both had at various points shown to be much closer than normal. Neither, however, will end up anywhere other than red as the results trickle in. 
  • Wisconsin once again traded spots with Michigan on the Spectrum. Similar to the two Trump states above, neither state seems poised to jump the partisan line away from Clinton. The trajectory of the race has headed in that general direction here at the end, but it is likely that that was more consolidation of partisan support (for Trump) than any wholesale shift away from Clinton or the Democrats. The temptation is there to suggest that the tightening in states like Michigan and Wisconsin is perhaps a reversion to the pre-Obama mean for the pair. Yet, that simply is not the case. Both are within range of exactly where they were in the Obama-Romney race four years ago.
  • The map and Watch List remained unchanged from a day ago.  

Changes since June 13 (first map of the cycle):
Rather than a noisy race, the opposite occurred instead. It has been a steady race through the lens of the graduated weighted average FHQ utilizes. Yes, that is largely a function of methodology. As the dataset grows -- as the number of polls increase -- shocks become less likely. Note, however, that even with the pedestrian methodology and the limitations it carries, FHQ ended up where a great many of the more sophisticated models are. We will have more on this in the aftermath of the election, but for now, what has changed since June:
  • The map always seemingly had 2012 as a jumping off point. Most presidential elections tend to build on the previous elections. The order of states remains largely the same and the movement tends to be more of a uniform shift one way or the other (with exceptions -- see Utah, 2016).
  • If 2012 was the starting point, then the first map was the 2012 Obama states plus North Carolina and Arizona. Arizona pushed back across the partisan line toward Trump around the conventions and settled in. North Carolina did not. There have been fluctuations from one poll to another in the Tar Heel state, but it, too, settled into the Clinton column. 
  • Arizona was not alone in jumping the partisan line over the last few months. The general election campaign witnessed Iowa cross the partisan line into the red and never really look back. Ohio, here at FHQ anyway, was more resistant. While the Buckeye state hopped the partisan line into Trump territory just yesterday, the second debate -- the town hall debate immediately after the Access Hollywood tape was released -- was the turning point in Ohio. The polls shifted toward Trump after that point and the average here shrunk smaller and smaller over time. 
  • One final change in comparing the first and last maps was the addition of the congressional districts in Maine and Nebraska. FHQ had not previously focused any on any of them, but added them since there was some data. We will confess that it was probably not enough data, but they were added nonetheless. Adding them did shift what had been a reliably electoral vote under the statewide distribution from Maine's second congressional district to Trump's total. 
  • The tipping point state has changed over time as well. Virginia was the initial spot where either Clinton or Trump would have crossed 270 electoral votes, but that changed a number of times and often included pairs of states as things split at 269-269 over the summer. That settled down later as the order of the states along the Lean/Toss Up line on the Clinton side of the Spectrum reshuffled. Colorado has been in that position since just before the first debate. And bear in mind, while the states have changed, the position of the tipping point state has not. The order has been that stable. 

Incorrect Projections?

  • FHQ has the least confidence in a few areas. First, Ohio is very close; the closest of all the states here at FHQ. It would not be a surprise if if jumped back over the partisan line into Clinton's column. At the same time, that is not what we are predicting. 
  • Second, the lack of data from Maine's second congressional district does not inspire confidence. The recent polling has favored Clinton by narrow margins, but a handful of Trump-favorable outliers from the late summer -- even when discounted in the weighted average -- still has that one tipped toward Trump here at FHQ.
  • Tough-to-poll Nevada is always a bit of a problem child. It has been biased toward the Republican (compared to the final results) in each of the last two cycles. It would not be a shock if the Silver state is not a more comfortable win for Clinton. But again, that is not the prediction here. 


--


Final FHQ Margins -- 11/8/16
State
MarginRating
Alabama
+20.86
Strong Trump
Alaska
+5.59
Lean Trump
Arizona
+1.73
Toss Up Trump
Arkansas
+18.46
Strong Trump
California
+22.89
Strong Clinton
Colorado
+3.83
Toss Up Clinton
Connecticut
+12.45
Strong Clinton
Delaware
+13.19
Strong Clinton
Florida
+1.87
Toss Up Clinton
Georgia
+3.17
Toss Up Trump
Hawaii
+28.24
Strong Clinton
Idaho
+24.19
Strong Trump
Illinois
+15.07
Strong Clinton
Indiana
+9.71
Lean Trump
Iowa
+1.33
Toss Up Trump
Kansas
+12.50
Strong Trump
Kentucky
+19.70
Strong Trump
Louisiana
+12.71
Strong Trump
Maine
+6.74
Lean Clinton
Maine CD1
+15.08
Strong Clinton
Maine CD2
+3.05
Toss Up Trump
Maryland
+28.12
Strong Clinton
Massachusetts
+23.92
Strong Clinton
Michigan
+6.46
Lean Clinton
Minnesota
+7.39
Lean Clinton
Mississippi
+10.69
Strong Trump
Missouri
+8.02
Lean Trump
Montana
+14.16
Strong Trump
Nebraska
+19.42
Strong Trump
Nevada
+0.81
Toss Up Clinton
New Hampshire
+4.82
Toss Up Clinton
New Jersey
+11.79
Strong Clinton
New Mexico
+6.58
Lean Clinton
New York
+19.73
Strong Clinton
North Carolina
+1.36
Toss Up Clinton
North Dakota
+19.01
Strong Trump
Ohio
+0.14
Toss Up Trump
Oklahoma
+24.96
Strong Trump
Oregon
+9.01
Lean Clinton
Pennsylvania
+4.86
Toss Up Clinton
Rhode Island
+12.52
Strong Clinton
South Carolina
+7.50
Lean Trump
South Dakota
+12.03
Strong Trump
Tennessee
+14.50
Strong Trump
Texas
+7.52
Lean Trump
Utah
+9.97
Lean Trump
Vermont
+24.07
Strong Clinton
Virginia
+6.12
Lean Clinton
Washington
+12.77
Strong Clinton
Washington, DC
+65.00
Strong Clinton
West Virginia
+24.76
Strong Trump
Wisconsin
+6.36
Lean Clinton
Wyoming
+35.69
Strong Trump


The Electoral College Spectrum1
HI-42
(7)
RI-4
(162)
NH-4
(263)
SC-9
(161)
TN-11
(61)
MD-10
(17)
NJ-14
(176)
CO-94
(272 | 275)
TX-38
(152)
AR-6
(50)
VT-3
(20)
OR-7
(183)
FL-29
(301 | 266)
MO-10
(114)
ND-3
(44)
MA-11
(31)
MN-10
(193)
NC-15
(316 | 237)
IN-11
(104)
NE-53
(41)
CA-55
(86)
ME-23
(195)
NV-6
(322 | 222)
UT-6
(93)
KY-8
(36)
NY-29
(115)
NM-5
(200)
OH-18
(216)
MS-6
(87)
AL-9
(28)
IL-20+13
(136)
MI-16
(216)
IA-6
(198)
SD-3
(81)
ID-4
(19)
DE-3
(139)
WI-10
(226)
AZ-11
(192)
KS-6
(78)
WV-5
(15)
WA-12
(151)
VA-13
(239)
GA-16+13
(181)
LA-8
(72)
OK-7
(10)
CT-7
(158)
PA-20
(259)
AK-3
(164)
MT-3
(64)
WY-3
(3)
1 Follow the link for a detailed explanation on how to read the Electoral College Spectrum.

2 The numbers in the parentheses refer to the number of electoral votes a candidate would have if he or she won all the states ranked prior to that state. If, for example, Trump won all the states up to and including Colorado (all Clinton's toss up states plus Colorado), he would have 275 electoral votes. Trump's numbers are only totaled through the states he would need in order to get to 270. In those cases, Clinton's number is on the left and Trumps's is on the right in bold italics.
To keep the figure to 50 cells, Washington, DC and its three electoral votes are included in the beginning total on the Democratic side of the spectrum. The District has historically been the most Democratic state in the Electoral College.

3 Maine and Nebraska allocate electoral college votes to candidates in a more proportional manner. The statewide winner receives the two electoral votes apportioned to the state based on the two US Senate seats each state has. Additionally, the winner within a congressional district is awarded one electoral vote. Given current polling, all five Nebraska electoral votes would be allocated to Trump. In Maine, a split seems more likely. Trump leads in Maine's second congressional district while Clinton is ahead statewide and in the first district. She would receive three of the four Maine electoral votes and Trump the remaining electoral vote. Those congressional district votes are added approximately where they would fall in the Spectrum above.

4 Colorado is the state where Clinton crosses the 270 electoral vote threshold to win the presidential election. That line is referred to as the victory line. Currently, Colorado is in the Toss Up Clinton category.



NOTE: Distinctions are made between states based on how much they favor one candidate or another. States with a margin greater than 10 percent between Clinton and Trump are "Strong" states. Those with a margin of 5 to 10 percent "Lean" toward one of the two (presumptive) nominees. Finally, states with a spread in the graduated weighted averages of both the candidates' shares of polling support less than 5 percent are "Toss Up" states. The darker a state is shaded in any of the figures here, the more strongly it is aligned with one of the candidates. Not all states along or near the boundaries between categories are close to pushing over into a neighboring group. Those most likely to switch -- those within a percentage point of the various lines of demarcation -- are included on the Watch List below.


The Watch List1
State
Switch
Alaska
from Lean Trump
to Toss Up Trump
Indiana
from Lean Trump
to Strong Trump
Mississippi
from Strong Trump
to Lean Trump
Nevada
from Toss Up Clinton
to Toss Up Trump
New Hampshire
from Toss Up Clinton
to Lean Clinton
Ohio
from Toss Up Trump
to Toss Up Clinton
Oregon
from Lean Clinton
to Strong Clinton
Pennsylvania
from Toss Up Clinton
to Lean Clinton
Utah
from Lean Trump
to Strong Trump
1 Graduated weighted average margin within a fraction of a point of changing categories.


Recent Posts:
The Electoral College Map (11/7/16)

The Electoral College Map (11/6/16)

The Electoral College Map (11/5/16)

Follow FHQ on TwitterGoogle+ and Facebook or subscribe by Email.

Monday, November 7, 2016

The Electoral College Map (11/7/16)



New State Polls (11/7/16)
Morning Polls
State
Poll
Date
Margin of Error
Sample
Clinton
Trump
Undecided
Poll Margin
FHQ Margin
Colorado
11/1-11/2
+/-2.27%
1863 likely voters
42
41
6
+1
+3.91
Florida
11/1-11/2
+/-2.02%
2352 likely voters
45
48
3
+3
--
Florida
11/3-11/6
+/-3.3%
884 likely voters
46
45
5
+1
+1.98
Georgia
11/6
+/-2.8%
1200 likely voters
46
49
2
+3
+3.04
Missouri
11/4-11/5
+/-3.5%
750 likely voters
41
47
4
+6
+8.02
Nevada
11/1-11/2
+/-2.31%
1793 likely voters
45
46
4
+1
--
Nevada
11/4-11/5
+/-3.9%
600 likely voters
47
46
2
+1
+0.96
New Hampshire
11/4-11/5
+/-3.0%
1000 likely voters
45
44
3
+1
--
New Hampshire
11/3-11/6
+/-3.7%
707 likely voters
49
38
4
+11
+4.82
New Mexico
11/6
+/-1.8%
8439 likely voters
46
44
1
+2
+6.44
North Carolina
11/1-11/2
+/-1.92%
2596 likely voters
45
48
2
+3
--
North Carolina
11/3-11/6
+/-3.3%
870 likely voters
47
45
4
+2
--
North Carolina
11/4-11/6
+/-3.5%
800 likely voters
44
44
6
+/-0
+1.36
Ohio
11/1-11/2
+/-1.94%
2557 likely voters
44
45
3
+1
--
Ohio
10/31-11/3
--
1194 likely voters
40
43
2
+3
--
Ohio
11/4-11/5
+/-3.2%
900 likely voters
39
46
6
+7
+0.01
Pennsylvania
11/1-11/2
+/-1.89%
2683 likely voters
46
45
3
+1
+5.00
Virginia
11/1-11/2
+/-1.77%
3076 likely voters
46
44
3
+2
--
Virginia
11/4-11/6
+/-3.6%
1193 likely voters
48
42
5
+6
+6.20
Wisconsin
11/1-11/2
+/-1.88%
2720 likely voters
49
41
4
+8
+6.49
Afternoon Polls
State
Poll
Date
Margin of Error
Sample
Clinton
Trump
Undecided
Poll Margin
FHQ Margin
Arizona
11/4-11/6
+/-4.12%
550 likely voters
44
47
1
+3
+1.71
Florida
11/5-11/6
+/-3.4%
853 likely voters
48
46
1
+2
--
Florida
11/6
+/-2.89%
1100 likely voters
46
50
1
+4
+1.89
Georgia
11/3-11/5
+/-4.6%
995 likely voters
43
49
3
+6
+3.14
Michigan
11/6
+/-2.77%
1200 likely voters
47
49
1
+2
+6.51
Nevada
11/1-11/4
+/-3.02%
1100 likely voters
45
50
2
+5
+0.80
Pennsylvania
11/3-11/5
+/-2.68%
1300 likely voters
47
48
2
+1
--
Pennsylvania
11/3-11/5
+/-4.3%
931 likely voters
45
43
4
+2
+4.84
Utah
11/3-11/5
+/-2.67%
1350 likely voters
30
40
2
+10
--
Utah
11/3-11/5
+/-4.9%
762 likely voters
23
40
4
+17
+9.971
Evening Polls
State
Poll
Date
Margin of Error
Sample
Clinton
Trump
Undecided
Poll Margin
FHQ Margin
Florida
11/1-11/2
+/-2.8%
1220 registered voters
46
45
2
+1
+1.87
Michigan
11/1-11/4
+/-3.0%
1079 registered voters
46
41
3
+5
+6.46
Nevada
11/3-11/6
+/-2.9%
1158 likely voters
45
43
5
+2
+0.83
New Mexico
11/1-11/2
+/-2.7%
1327 registered voters
45
37
2
+8
+6.58
North Carolina
11/1-11/4
+/-2.8%
1250 registered voters
46
45
3
+1
+1.36
Virginia
11/1-11/4
+/-2.7%
1362 registered voters
47
42
3
+5
--
Virginia
11/2-11/6
+/-4.4%
802 likely voters
45
41
14
+4
+6.12
1Excluding the two head-to-head online panel surveys in Utah lowers Trump's average advantage there to 8.48 points. Those polls are outliers in view of the majority of surveys in the Beehive state during 2016 and serve as an anchor on the data. The change would shift Utah within the Lean Trump category, closer to Toss Up Trump. McMullin garnered 24% in the YouGov survey and 25% support in the Trafalgar survey. He currently has an FHQ graduated weighted average share of support of 23.39%, trailing both Trump and Clinton.


--
Changes (11/7/16) -- Early edition
One last day.
Changes (November 7 -- Morning)
StateBeforeAfter
OhioToss Up ClintonToss Up Trump
  • Ohio jumped the partisan line from Toss Up Clinton to Toss Up Trump, but note the average: +0.01. The Buckeye state is close here at FHQ. 
  • Nevada rejoins the Watch List, slipping under the Clinton +1 threshold, but the Silver state has been hovering there. 
  • Colorado slides off the Watch List. It is now just a bit more than a point from the Lean/Toss Up line (+5) on the Clinton side of the partisan line. 
  • The ZiaPoll survey of New Mexico -- given the sample size, it was the whole state -- drew the average in a bit further. It has tracked down to about a six and a half point lead for Clinton in the Land of Enchantment. That pushed New Mexico down to the lower half of the Lean Clinton group of states on the Electoral College Spectrum. 
Late edition
Changes (November 7 -- Afternoon)
StateBeforeAfter
PennsylvaniaLean ClintonToss Up Clinton
  • The Trafalgar and YouGov surveys were enough of a drag on the FHQ average in Pennsylvania that the Keystone state slipped just under the Lean/Toss Up line. Pennsylvania, then, follows New Hampshire as states that have until recently been just above that line but have hopped over it into the Toss Up Clinton area. Both remain clustered around that line, however; just on the opposite side.  
  • That move also flips Pennsylvania on the Watch List, but keeps it in the same position on the Spectrum. 
  • The Trafalgar survey of Michigan is the first to show Trump ahead since 2015. It may be a sign of something in the Great Lakes state or it could be an outlier (balancing out that MSU survey from last week). Either way, it decreased the average margin enough to ease Michigan past Maine on the Spectrum. 
  • Also, Utah once again traded spots with Indiana, pushing to the very end of the Lean Trump area. The new polls out of the Beehive state nudge Trump even closer to 40 percent in the averages. Again, that will be enough to keep Clinton and McMullin at bay there and Utah in the Republican column.
Late late edition

  • The Breibart wave of last minute Gravis polling releases mostly confirmed the state of the race in each of the states. There was some shuffling among the New Mexico, Michigan, Wisconsin cluster in the Lean Clinton area. New Mexico bounced back slightly after pushing down that column earlier in the day. Everything else held steady.


Barring anything unforeseen or any straggler surveys, this is likely what the final map will look like on election day. There are a few polls yet to be added into the dataset (the non-Breitbart wave of Gravis polls), but the expectation is that that will not alter the bottom line any if at all. It will not where it counts in any event: Clinton 322, Trump 216.

--


The Electoral College Spectrum1
MD-102
(13)
RI-4
(162)
NH-4
(263)
TX-38
(161)
TN-11
(61)
HI-4
(17)
NJ-14
(176)
CO-94
(272 | 275)
SC-9
(123)
AR-6
(50)
VT-3
(20)
OR-7
(183)
FL-29
(301 | 266)
MO-10
(114)
ND-3
(44)
MA-11
(31)
MN-10
(193)
NC-15
(316 | 237)
IN-11
(104)
NE-53
(41)
CA-55
(86)
ME-23
(195)
NV-6
(322 | 222)
UT-6
(93)
KY-8
(36)
NY-29
(115)
NM-5
(200)
OH-18
(216)
MS-6
(87)
AL-9
(28)
IL-20+13
(136)
WI-10
(210)
IA-6
(198)
SD-3
(81)
ID-4
(19)
DE-3
(139)
MI-16
(226)
AZ-11
(192)
KS-6
(78)
WV-5
(15)
WA-12
(151)
VA-13
(239)
GA-16+13
(181)
LA-8
(72)
OK-7
(10)
CT-7
(158)
PA-20
(259)
AK-3
(164)
MT-3
(64)
WY-3
(3)
1 Follow the link for a detailed explanation on how to read the Electoral College Spectrum.

2 The numbers in the parentheses refer to the number of electoral votes a candidate would have if he or she won all the states ranked prior to that state. If, for example, Trump won all the states up to and including Colorado (all Clinton's toss up states plus Colorado), he would have 275 electoral votes. Trump's numbers are only totaled through the states he would need in order to get to 270. In those cases, Clinton's number is on the left and Trumps's is on the right in bold italics.
To keep the figure to 50 cells, Washington, DC and its three electoral votes are included in the beginning total on the Democratic side of the spectrum. The District has historically been the most Democratic state in the Electoral College.

3 Maine and Nebraska allocate electoral college votes to candidates in a more proportional manner. The statewide winner receives the two electoral votes apportioned to the state based on the two US Senate seats each state has. Additionally, the winner within a congressional district is awarded one electoral vote. Given current polling, all five Nebraska electoral votes would be allocated to Trump. In Maine, a split seems more likely. Trump leads in Maine's second congressional district while Clinton is ahead statewide and in the first district. She would receive three of the four Maine electoral votes and Trump the remaining electoral vote. Those congressional district votes are added approximately where they would fall in the Spectrum above.

4 Colorado is the state where Clinton crosses the 270 electoral vote threshold to win the presidential election. That line is referred to as the victory line. Currently, Colorado is in the Toss Up Clinton category.



NOTE: Distinctions are made between states based on how much they favor one candidate or another. States with a margin greater than 10 percent between Clinton and Trump are "Strong" states. Those with a margin of 5 to 10 percent "Lean" toward one of the two (presumptive) nominees. Finally, states with a spread in the graduated weighted averages of both the candidates' shares of polling support less than 5 percent are "Toss Up" states. The darker a state is shaded in any of the figures here, the more strongly it is aligned with one of the candidates. Not all states along or near the boundaries between categories are close to pushing over into a neighboring group. Those most likely to switch -- those within a percentage point of the various lines of demarcation -- are included on the Watch List below.


The Watch List1
State
Switch
Alaska
from Lean Trump
to Toss Up Trump
Indiana
from Lean Trump
to Strong Trump
Mississippi
from Strong Trump
to Lean Trump
Nevada
from Toss Up Clinton
to Toss Up Trump
New Hampshire
from Toss Up Clinton
to Lean Clinton
Ohio
from Toss Up Trump
to Toss Up Clinton
Oregon
from Lean Clinton
to Strong Clinton
Pennsylvania
from Toss Up Clinton
to Lean Clinton
Utah
from Lean Trump
to Strong Trump
1 Graduated weighted average margin within a fraction of a point of changing categories.


Recent Posts:
The Electoral College Map (11/6/16)

The Electoral College Map (11/5/16)

The Electoral College Map (11/4/16)

Follow FHQ on TwitterGoogle+ and Facebook or subscribe by Email.